Follow us:

Search
Close this search box.
Search
Close this search box.

INMESOL Generator Set at a Sewage Pumping Station in NEW ZEALAND

An INMESOL genset, model IT-1115, has been servicing the sewage pumping station for the treatment plant managed by the council of Porirua, in New Zealand, for several months.

Pumping station at the Porirua sewage treatment plant

An INMESOL genset, model IT-1115, has been servicing the sewage pumping station for the treatment plant managed by the council of Porirua, in New Zealand, for several months.

Genset model IT-1115 being placed at the pumping station facility
Genset model IT-1115 being placed at the pumping station facility

This heavy range 1110 KVA LTP power generator set operates in stand-by mode and ensures power supply in case of mains failure, preventing the pumping works interruption and the environmental impact caused by the possible overflowing of sewage in the plant, in the event of a power outage.

The genset is setup up in stand-by with the mains, supplying power to three 290 kW pumps with a 1200 l/s pumping capacity connected to the treatment plant, where a second generator set with the same features is installed, also in stand-by mode.

Genset model IT-1115 installed at the pumping station facility
Genset model IT-1115 installed at the pumping station facility

Any waste water purification system has three essential components:

  • Sewage water collection and transport of the collected water to the treatment station.
  • Treatment of waste water per se.
  • Disposal of the resulting products.
Porirua waste water treatment plant facilities. Image taken from the Porirua Council website
Porirua waste water treatment plant facilities. Image taken from the Porirua Council website

The collection and transport of waste water is carried out through a complex network of pipes and collection systems starting at the residences or waste water generation sites (sewage system, collectors…) and ending at the pumping stations and their treatment plants. These pumping stations are usually located at the lowest areas in towns or cities as, thanks to gravity, all water courses will end there. These waste waters are commonly pumped to higher areas, where they will be treated or disposed of during the final purification stage.

The treatment process has different stages, depending on the type of plant, the intended purification level, and the specific environmental conditions of the area where the purified water will be discharged.

The main objective of a waste water treatment plant is to return it to the environment with a minimum pollution level but, if the plant has the right processes available, fertilisers for the agricultural industry may be obtained by dehydrating the muds involved in the process.

INFOGRAPHIC or typical flow of a waste water treatment plant
INFOGRAPHIC or typical flow of a waste water treatment plant

An efficient waste water treatment makes it possible to return the liquid to the natural environment and reduce the impact and pollution caused by water consumption, both at the domestic and industrial levels, to obtain agricultural fertilisers, and even to generate electricity.